Samsung Going All Green by 2020

Samsung will switch to more sustainable alternatives by 2020.

Samsung recently announced that it will be switching away from plastics towards more sustainable alternatives by 2020. In recent years, Samsung has faced mounting pressure from critics who believe they are hurting, not helping, the environment.

Realizing their green gestures went largely unnoticed and were formerly met with contempt, Samsung has decided to join its rivals, such as Apple and T-Mobile, who have already started lowering their carbon footprints. Samsung announced it has begun to replace plastic packaging with eco-friendly materials.

Starting in the first half of 2019, bioplastics, recycled plastics, and paper will be used instead of regular plastic as the material for phone boxes, paperwork, and other items. Samsung has also taken their design to the next level by focusing on product design that minimizes waste. An interesting example was reported by Hypebeat:

...phone chargers will be coated with matte so that plastic protection films will not be needed to keep them unblemished while transporting.

Samsung has announced that the full transition will be complete within a two-year period. The goal is to make a more sustainable footprint as well as attract new customers who cherish sustainable brands. Ultimately, Samsung could become an influential renewable model for other electronic companies who are also looking to reduce their environmental footprint.

What I find cool is how social pressure has rightly caused Samsung to evolve their business for good. While there has been significant NGO and Environmental Group pressure, it would also seem that Samsung has conceded that resources, consumer sentiment, and scale are future drivers of sustainable products. It is a great reminder that sustainability can be profitable and good for the planet.

Reality Changing Observations:

Q1. What do you think will be the impact of Samsung going green?

Q2. Would you consider buying a Samsung phone due to this initiative?

Q3. Do you generally think about the environmental impacts of the products you buy? Why or why not?

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